Teachers & Practice Leaders

Zen is not about anything. It is the practice of being present right here, right now. It is learning to meet everything that arises with an open mind and a forgiving heart. To do this, a serious student can benefit from the experienced guidance, encouragement, and presence of the teacher. Our teacher, Kosho McCall, is available to meet with students to discuss their practice life.

Kosho McCall, Teacher and Head Priest

KoshoKosho McCall is a Soto Zen Buddhist Priest and Teacher in the lineage of Zen Master Shunryu Suzuki. He was born in Indiana in 1948 and grew up in Maine. He ordained as an Episcopal priest in 1976 and in 1988 went to study at the San Francisco Zen Center for the next 20 years. He ordained as a Zen priest in 1997. For twelve years he lived and trained at Tassajara Zen Mountain Center, becoming its Head of Monastic Practice in 2004. He received Dharma Transmission (permission to teach) from his teacher, Zenkei Hartman Roshi. In 2009, Kosho accepted the Austin Zen Center"s invitation to become their Zen teacher. Kosho may be contacted by calling 512-452-5777.

Mako Voelkel

MakoUnzan Mako Voelkel has been practicing at San Francisco Zen Center since 1997. In 2002, she ended a teaching position in Philosophy at the City College of San Francisco to become a full time resident at Tassajara. Ordained by Ryushin Paul Haller in 2004 and Shuso (Head Monk) at Tassajara in 2009, where she was for several years the Director.

Graham Ross

GrahamUnzan Graham Ross has been practicing residentially at Tassajara since 2004. He was ordained by Ryushin Paul Haller in 2007 and was Shuso (Head Monk) in 2010. His latest job was Ino (Head of the Meditation Hall). Before going to Tassajara Graham received a 1st degree black belt in the Saito Sensei lineage of Aikido in 2002.

Glenn Noblin

Glenn NoblinGlenn Noblin is a retired ordained United Methodist minister and licensed clinical social worker. He has had a lively interest in Zen since 1967 when he was first introduced to it in a college course. Glenn started practicing at the Austin Zen Center in 2006. Before this he had practiced at the Maria Kannon Zen Center in Dallas, Texas for 10 years. He has served as a member of the AZC Board of Directors. Glenn received entrustment as a lay teacher in 2012. Glenn can be contacted at ganoblin@gmail.com.


Practice Leadership at AZC

The role of a Practice Leader is to be available to help you with issues associated with your Zen practice. The qualifications for being a Practice Leader at AZC are having practiced Zen for many years, having been Shuso (Head Student) for a Practice Period, and a close relationship with the Teacher.

Betty Holmes

Betty HolmesBetty Holmes has studied and trained for the past sixteen years with Lama Surya Das and Lama John Makransky as well as H.H. Drukchen Rinpoche and Lama Willa Miller in practices of Wisdom and Compassion from the Tibetan Dzogchen tradition. She is also a longtime student of Tenshin Reb Anderson of the San Francisco Zen Center and a member of the Austin Zen Center. She received her master's degree in counseling from St. Edward's University and is trained in Internal Family Systems Therapy, Hakomi Loving Presence and Gottman Method Couple's Therapy.

Pat Yingst

Pat YingstPat Yingst began practicing Zen meditation in 1988 and has been a member of Austin Zen Center since its inception. She has seven years experience teaching meditation in prisons and is active in the Austin intra-Buddhist prison volunteer organization, Inside Meditation. For two years, she served as office manager/bookkeeper for the center in 2005-2006. She was co-editor of AZC's journal, Just This, for its first five years. Pat is currently a member of the AZC Board of Directors. Pat can be contacted at PatYingst@gmail.com



Give
Join

Dharma Talks

  

Kosho McCall, April 5, 2014,
"How Do I Cultivate the Way of the Buddhas?"

AZC Dharma Talks »


Guest Practice

KesuInterested in either starting or deepening your Zen practice in a residential setting with others? Our Guest Practice program is a short term opportunity (one to four weeks) that includes meditation, study, work practice and discussions with other practitioners about Zen Buddhism.

Learn More »

JustThis

Spring

AJ Bunyard

Spring is one of our blessings—new beginnings, new life. But new life is a life not only of blossoms but of thorns and weeds. Life does not stay new; spring is inherently one part of a greater cycle of growing and dying. So we look deeper. What is spring when it neither comes nor goes?

Join the JustThis writers and artists in their examination of Spring.

justthis.austinzencenter.org




virtual="/includes/rightcol.inc" -->